Home Remedy Treatment, an Alternative Method for Your Health

By this time you surely have heard the term of home remedies. This type of health treatment is an alternative medical treatment to heal an ailment or health problem that you can do it yourself without going to a clinic, hospital and even without any prescription from a doctor. You can see some samples of the home remedies from homeremedieslog that you can do it by yourself.

For example; when your feet is in pain you will have a choice whether going to a doctor to get professional medical treatment to cure your feet, or you can try to heal it yourself using some home remedies that are available. You can find out more information about home remedy from wikipedia.

If you compare the home remedy’s treatment with other various medical treatment, you will discover that home remedy treatment is much simpler and easier. Some of them are even more effective and efficient compare to modern medication.

But, before searching any information of home remedies for your health problem, you must aware that although many of the treatments are actually working, many of them are not approved or recommended by modern medical practitioner. And you also must know that some home remedy treatments could have different result among people who use it.

The home remedies treatment usually made from natural products such as plants or herbal medicine; although it can also use other common items that you can find around your house such as duct tape or superglue. You can find out some samples of natural herbal medicine from MedlinePlus.

A word of cations; if you are going to use a home remedy treatment, you must not use the treatment which is using substance that you are allergic in to or if your doctor is against such treatment. You also must know and understand any side effect that may or will happen on each of the home remedies treatment.

Due to the popularity of home remedies, there are many people who are trying to take some profit for themselves in dishonest way. Therefore, arm yourself with knowledge by understanding the ingredients, its benefit and the effect of the ingredients that are used inside the self-proclaim home remedies products which are often sold freely.

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Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

Nothing is more frustrating than the pain and discomfort that occurs in the days that follow a workout. The common muscle soreness and stiffness experienced one to two days after a workout may be so uncomfortable, particularly to the new exerciser, that it may discourage future workout attempts. As someone once said after her first workout, “What’s the use of getting fit if I can’t even get out of bed in the morning?”

Every exerciser, regardless of experience, deals with sore and stiff muscles following a particular workout. It is important to understand why this occurs and what to do about it in order to deal with this common, although irritating, phenomenon.

Why do I feel so much pain after a workout?

The typical muscle soreness experienced in the days following a workout is referred to as Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) and is characterized by stiffness, pain and sometimes weakness in the exercised muscles. The soreness can last several days after a workout, with the height of the pain occurring about 48 hours following the workout activity.

Studies report that DOMS is most likely the result of microscopic damage or tearing of muscle fibers with the amount of damage correlated to the intensity, amount, and kind of exercise that occurs. DOMS is also related to an individual’s exercise history, and is most typical among those who are either starting out in an exercise program or those who change the intensity or type of exercise.

DOMS appears to be strongly affected by eccentric muscle actions. Commonly referred to as the “negative” part of an exercise, eccentric action occurs when a muscle resists while it is forced to lengthen. This action happens in movements such as descending stairs, downhill running, and landing a jump, or with the lowering movements in exercises such as squats, lunges or pushups.

Although there is no conclusive proof, researchers have suggested that DOMS may also be related to inflammation that occurs in and around a muscle. Swelling may occur following exercise, which increases pressure and causes discomfort.

How do I deal with this?

Although no surefire documented method exists to entirely get rid of DOMS, some treatments may temporarily alleviate some of the discomfort, such as application of ice, ultrasound and anti-inflammatory medication (aspirin, ibuprofen). Massage may also reduce some of the symptoms, but this method has not been proven.

As the saying goes, “time heals all wounds.” DOMS usually dissipates within 3 to 7 days following exercise with no special treatment. Severe pain lasting longer than this time frame may indicate an acute injury and should be treated by a medical professional.

How can I prevent this from happening again?

There is no known technique or drug that entirely prevents DOMS. However, there may be some things you can do before you exercise to keep DOMS at a minimum. Popular fitness theory suggests warming up thoroughly then gently stretching both before and after exercise. Training with your limitations in mind is always a smart idea, building intensity over time rather than attempting an all-out effort on your first try.

The good news: The best prevention is regular exercise. Studies have demonstrated that continued training acts in a preventative fashion to reduce muscle soreness. Regular endurance training, specifically, has been shown to be a method of preventing the onset of DOMS.

The typical soreness experienced after training, or DOMS, is part of the process of getting stronger and reaching your fitness goals. The best method to reduce this somewhat frustrating part of starting or modifying a fitness program is none other than consistent effort.

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Piriformis Syndrome (Sciatic Pain) II

Sciatic PainSciatic pain comes about either due to a traumatic event, muscle imbalances, or a combination of both.

When you have an injury to a muscle, both strength and flexibility are compromised, and if your recovery ends before strength and flexibility return, you will never be 100% and will likely struggle with the problem forever.

The other way sciatic pain creeps into your life is due to your lifestyle and habits, and that is what we like to call the process. The process can be described as a prolonged onset of symptoms based on your everyday activities.

However, from a technical stand point the process really describes the development of the muscle imbalance in your hip. The Piriformis muscle is responsible for external rotation (moving your leg so your feet point outward). So over time that muscle gets tight from the positions you put yourself in and weaken from lack of use.

Here are some examples: If you sit on the edge of your chair with you legs separated and your feet pointing outward you are keeping your Piriformis muscle in a shortened position and that’s how it gets tight and with extended sitting in that position, it gets weak form lack of use. Hence the imbalance.

Another example is runners and bikers who actually work very hard tend to get sciatica because they fail to keep a strength vs. stretch balance in their workouts. Hence the imbalance creates a greater pull toward external rotation and the result is a tight Piriformis and an irritated sciatic nerve creating pain.

These are just two examples of how muscle imbalances can affect the Piriformis muscle and cause sciatic pain. You may not be a runner or cyclist but I’ll bet you have muscle imbalances that are causing your sciatic pain!

In severe cases, the sciatic pain can run from the top of the hip to the bottom of the foot. It is very important to recognize that changes and shifting of pain is often times a sign of improvement. Furthermore as a way of gauging recovery, take note of how far down the leg the pain goes.

If the pain goes to the foot one day and then only makes it to the calf and then to the knee and then it can only make it to the hamstring that is a sign of improvement. You should feel good about those noticeable improvements and this should give you encouragement to keep working toward a full remission of pain.

So how do you get rid of your pain? Will learning one new stretch be enough? It very well may be. However depending on the severity of your condition you may need to change your activities of daily living to include new stretches, new exercises that include the use of the hip rotators like roller-blading, basketball, tennis, etc, and even better, specific corrective exercise specific to your situation like those covered in our video. As always, learn as much as you can about your condition, so that you can ask the tough questions to your healthcare providers and get the best care possible.

One last point, sciaitic pain is not caused by a lack of prescription medications so don’t think that taking some anti-inflammatories or muscle relaxants will fix it, it won’t! Also, many people are able to eliminate sciatic pain within days just by performing a few exercises and stretches, but not general exercise, the exact corrective exercises and stretches they need to do.

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Piriformis Syndrome (Sciatic Pain)

Piriformis SyndromeSciatica and Piriformis Syndrome are the same condition, it is just that the medical community is starting to call the condition by the muscle (Piriformis) that is involved and getting away from calling it by the name of the nerve that is involved (sciatic) nothing more than semantics.

Did you go see your primary care physician and get diagnosis of Sciatica only to have them refer you to an orthopedic specialist and then get a diagnosis of Piriformis Syndrome and then be told to see a Physical Therapist and the PT tells you a little heat, ultra sound, electrical stimulation and some therapeutic exercises and we will have you good as new???

If this is the path you have been down and you’re tired of all the worthless treatments that just don’t work, you must read this article! I guarantee you, it will likely be far different than what you have read or heard anywhere else!

Sciatic pain is simply caused by pressure being placed on the sciatic nerve and there are primarily four things that can create this you may have one or more of the following:

Pressure caused by shortening and tightening of the piriformis muscle. This is almost always due to months or years of muscle imbalances in the hip rotator muscles.

Pressure caused by spinal stenosis, which is a decrease in the space between the vertebrae. This is primarily caused by uneven pressure and compression due to muscle imbalances.

Pressure caused by Isthmic spondylolisthesis which is simply when a vertebrae slips or moves… this can sometimes pinch the sciatic nerve but often times people who have this condition don’t have any pain, symptoms, or even know they have it!

Pressure caused by a herniated or bulging disc. A herniation is when a disc protrudes out from between the vertebrae and this can either be caused by an event like a car accident, or, by months or years of uneven pressure due to muscle imbalances. It is also important to note that many people with herniated discs don’t even experience pain or symptoms, and many don’t know they have the condition.

As you can see, there is a trend here… in nearly every case, muscle imbalances are the primary cause of the pressure being placed on the sciatic nerve.

If you are not sure which one of the four is causing your sciatic pain, I recommend you start with the basics. Most cases of sciatic pain are caused by muscle imbalances so if you begin to work on correcting any muscle imbalances you have, you should start to see improvement right away.

The event scenario is most likely the catalyst for sudden onset of sciatic pain. So what happens when there is undue stress on the Piriformis muscle that stress causes it to go into spasm and then you have pain due to the Piriformis muscle putting pressure on the sciatic nerve.

In most cases, people go to physical therapy or minimize their physical activity to break the pain – spasm cycle and in most cases your symptoms subside. However the event will also set you up for a life time of sciatic pain if the Piriformis muscle does not recover 100% in both strength and flexibility.

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