Natural Supplement to Alleviate Arthritic Symptoms

On the last post we have discussed about the importance of good nutrition to prevent arthritis and joint pain. But for people who already affected by the disease will need help to overcome their situation, taking drugs medication treatment or using natural supplements such as Celadrin, MSM, Glucosamine, and Chondroitin are commonly taken to alleviate arthritic symptoms.

Taken in pill form these supplements may take up to several months before individuals begin to feel better therefore most people give up before they even begin to see results. Pills are required to be broken down by the digestive system before the necessary ingredients can be absorbed by the bloodstream and intestinal track and it may take that long to get enough of these ingredients into the body to be helpful.

Gel-nutrition is a new natural alternative which takes these same proven ingredients and keeps them in a pre-hydrated state so that the body can quickly absorb them into the bloodstream for quick relief of pain and they begins to nourish the body and its joints with-in one hour after ingestion. Positive results have been seen with-in 4 to 72 hours depending on the individual.

Here are some brief explanations about these ingredients and what do they do.

Celadrin or cetyl myristoleate – is a blend of cetylated fatty acids that provides lubrication to the joints. Cetyl myristoleate was found to circulate in the blood of mice and made them immune to arthritis. Celadrin may also act as an anti-inflammatory agent.

MSM or methylsulfonylmethane – is a naturally occurring, organic, sulfur compound. Taken as a nutritional dietary source of sulfur, which is the 4th most abundant element in the human body, MSM is necessary for making and repairing cartilage. MSM has been shown to relieve pain as a result of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

Glucosamine – is a small carbohydrate molecule which is naturally synthesized (produced) in the body. This synthesis declines with aging therefore the need to supplement. Glucosamine supports cartilage maintenance and strength therefore reducing and relieving joint pain.

Chondroitin or chondroitin sulfate – is naturally synthesized in the body and supports strong cartilage. Chondroitin protects existing cartilage by reducing water loss and by slowing the breakdown of the cartilage. Glucosamine and Chondroitin work together to protect the cartilage from wear and tear and help it maintain its strength.

As you can see each supplement has its own job to do and how all 4 are necessary to maintaining healthy joints and reducing pain. But people need to know that these ingredients have slow results. Although people who are living with chronic pain want quick results, they need to realize this problem took years to create and would not be fixed overnight. The effect of these supplements can be felt after few weeks of regular consumption along with proper nutrition.

Do your body a favor, educate yourself on gel-nutrition and begin to enjoy life.

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Find Out More about Pain Management Doctors

Pain Management DoctorsIn most cases, the pain management doctors are happens to be anesthesiologists. Anesthesiologists ensure that you are safe, pain-free and comfortable during and after surgery. They are also at work in the labor and delivery area, or in doctors’ chambers where painful medical tests or procedures are performed. But the methods applied by anesthesiologists have now traveled beyond these familiar territories, and led to the development of a new category of medicine known as pain medicine.

In many cases, an anesthesiologist heads a team of other specialists and doctors who work together to alleviate your pain. The anesthesiologist or other pain medicine doctors like neurologists, oncologists, orthopedists, and psychiatrists, and non-physician specialists like nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, physical or rehabilitation therapists and psychologists, join together to assess your condition. After a thorough assessment, this team of specialists develops a treatment plan just for you.

Pain management doctors are specialists at diagnosing the reasons for your pain as well as treating the pain itself. Arthritis, back and neck pain, cancer pain, nerve pain, migraine headaches, shingles, and phantom limb pain for amputees are among the most common pain problems they usually manage.

Pain management doctors also treat acute pain caused by surgery, a debilitating illness or a serious injury. Among such pains is post knee-joint replacement pain, pain during recovery from a car accident, pain following stomach or chest surgery, or pain associated with sickle cell disease. They can treat the patient in the hospital or in an outpatient clinic.

The pain medicine doctor usually works closely with your own physician. They will review your medical records and X-rays as required. To have a clear understanding of the case, they will give you a detailed questionnaire. Your replies will help them to assess how your pain is affecting your daily life. Pain management doctors will also carry out a complete physical examination on you. They may even go for additional tests and review all the results to find the root cause of your pain and determine how the problem can be solved.

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Overcome the Pain after Hiking Activity

Pain after HikingCalves are burning, knees hurt and legs feel like Jello. After a major hike, the body is asking, “why the torture?” How to deal with post-hiking pain and recovery is something every hiker faces as they advance to more strenuous levels.

For day-hikers, backpackers and trail runners, after-care for pain is a very real part of the sport. Injuries and lactic acid build-up can keep a hiker sidelined for days and make the simple act of going down stairs excruciating. Many precautions can be taken to ensure less stress to legs, knees and feet during a hike, but as every seasoned hiker knows, it’s not going uphill that’s the problem it’s coming down!

Hiking down a steep descent places additional stress on knees and muscles that have not been conditioned for downhill activity. Joints and tendons become painfully inflamed. And pushing past ones level of ability and distance, increases the production of lactic acid, resulting in a burning feeling in leg muscles. Don’t let pain be a discouraging factor in pursuing higher achievements on the trail. The sense of loftiness felt when reaching the pinnacle of a climb is worth conquering post-hiking pain.

Prehiking suggestions to minimize pain:

Get fitted with sturdy, stable boots or trail running shoes.

Buy shoes/boots that are at ½ to 1 full size larger than your regular shoe size. After several hours of hiking, feet will swell and need room to expand.

Wear socks that can absorb moisture and to minimize blisters.

Pre-condition legs weeks before a strenuous hike by doing short hill hikes and strengthening exercises (squats, lunges, step-ups and step-downs). You can also increase your lactic acid threshold and level of fatigue (thereby lowering the occurrence of sore muscles) by increasing your activity level and training at 85%-90% of your maximum heart rate for at least 20 minutes daily.

Use stretching exercises for problem areas such as hamstring, IT band, etc. to increase flexibility.

If needed, wear leg braces to stabilize knees and help reduce stress.

Stay hydrated and eat carbohydrates and protein during and after the hike. This can help minimize lactic acid build-up.

Use a hiking pole(s) to redistribute weight, help with balance and reduce stress on the knees.

Learn the technique of heel-to-toe walking so as to make full contact with heel to the ground.

Try to control uphill and downhill progression so as not to bound, go too fast, or “pound” the trail. Slightly bend knees when descending. Make a conscious effort to keep weight centered with the knee tracking directly over the toe (no twisting in or out). An automatic response to descending a hill is to lean backwards, rather than stay centered. This can result in injury, such as IT Band Friction Syndrome.

Post-hiking suggestions for dealing with pain:

Ice painful or swollen joints and muscles immediately after a hike. If pain persists, continue at intervals for up to 48 hours. Icing will decrease inflammation, reduce swelling and numb pain.

Rest after the hike, but don’t become immobile. Walking or light exercise will keep blood flowing and increase recovery.

Gentle stretches will help stiff, tight muscles.

Massage painful muscles with long, smooth movements.

If needed, use a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), such as ibuprofen, to reduce pain and inflammation.

Some hikers benefit from alternating ice packs and heat therapy. This should only be done after 48 hours and inflammation has subsided. Applying heat immediately after a hike will increase swelling and prolong recovery time.

Disclaimer: This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical treatment or consultation. Always consult with your physician in the event of a serious injury.

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Get Help from Pain Management Clinics

Pain Management ClinicsNo sane person wants to live with chronic pain. The adverse side effects of reckless consumption of painkillers are now driving many sufferers to pain management clinics. These clinics provide multiple approaches to pain management for the best possible results. According to a survey, nearly 60 percent of people with chronic pain undergoing treatment in a pain clinic for a year experience a significant reduction in their sufferings.

Some pain management clinics focus on a single method of treatment, like the injection of steroids to reduce inflammation, headache or back pain. Others provide more varied types of approaches.

Many clinics these days use multiple treatment providers employing specialists from various areas of medicine, who share information and coordinate care for the best possible results. These health care providers might include a neurologist, anesthesiologist, internist, family physician, physical medicine specialist, psychologist, psychiatrist and physical therapist.

Medications prescribed by a doctor in a pain clinic program include pain medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAID), steroids to reduce inflammation, muscle relaxants or anti-anxiety medication to reduce tension, and antidepressants or anti-convulsants to help control specific types of nerve pain.

Pain clinics may also offer non-drug therapies including individual and/or family therapy, hot and cold therapy, physical therapy, biofeedback, massage, acupuncture, breathing exercises, self-hypnosis and TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation).

You must check whether the clinic is accredited or not before making a decision. Accreditation ensures that the program fulfils the basic requirements for appropriate medical care. Certification by the American Academy of Pain Management indicates that the clinic has gone through a thorough peer-reviewed compliance process that was established by pain practitioners. You should also look for certification by the American Board of Anesthesiology and the American Board of Pain Medicine.

Johns Hopkins Center, Mensana Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic are among the top pain clinics in the United States. But there are many other pain management clinics that are available in every state. Consult your physician to decide which one is appropriate for you.

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