Basic Symptoms, Signs & Diagnosis of Foot Pain

Foot PainWhen it comes to foot pain, everyone is different, but the most common sign is going to be discomfort in one or more parts of the foot. The first thing a foot pain sufferer needs to do is to make sure the source of the pain isn’t coming from something that isn’t easily fixed, such as an ill-fitting pair of shoes or a high pair of heels.

With those common culprits removed from the picture, it’s a good idea to notice things like where the pain starts and if it migrates at all, what time of day and during what activity the pain is most acute, a particular event that might have caused the pain, any lingering health concerns that might have attributed to the pain and so on.

The symptoms of foot pain are pretty much common sense. Anything that you feel in your foot that isn’t right. Things like swelling that won’t go away, random numbness for no apparent reason in the feet, unexplained redness and either the feet being too warm or too cold without any cause. Considering how important your feet are to your basic health and wellbeing, don’t’ wait for one of these specific symptoms to worsen before you go seek the advice of a doctor.

Diagnosing foot pain is a fairly straight-forward affair. A podiatrist is a foot specialist, and goes to school for a lot of years to be able to hold someone’s foot in their hands and listen to the type of pain you’re suffering from and be able to tell you what the problem is.

You should expect your doctor to ask you about the types of shoes you wear and what physical activity you engage in that might have resulted in the foot pain. If the doctor is unable to diagnose your condition by touch, medical science has equipped the intrepid doctor with several tools that might just do the job.

X rays are used to take a picture of the inside of your foot using low doses of radiation. While excessive exposure to x-rays has proven to be bad for you, getting an x-ray once in a while won’t hurt. The x-ray can tell the doctor if there are small breaks, fractures or fissures that could be causing your foot pain.

MRI machines (magnetic resonance imaging) can be used in the same way as the x-ray to see inside your foot without having to cut you open. The MRI machine uses magnets to make images on a computer screen. The doctor can then tell if there are any problems with the bones and the soft tissue inside the foot. It can also help pinpoint small fractures that might not be clear on the x-ray.

If the doctor thinks it’s arthritis that’s causing your foot pain, he can request a synovial fluid analysis. Don’t let the big medical name fool you, it’s a straight forward procedure where the doctor takes fluid samples from the joints in the foot and tests them to see if the surrounding joint is arthritic.

A proper diagnosis is extremely important to ensure that you are properly treating and curing your type of foot pain.

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The Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

The Symptoms of FibromyalgiaFibromyalgia is a syndrome (fibromyalgia syndrome, or FMS), or a cluster of problems. People who have fibromyalgia suffer with pain, either all over or in particular places, have sleeping problems, are overwhelmingly tired and may have many other symptoms.

Five to ten per cent of the population has fibromyalgia. Most of them are women, but men and children do experience the symptoms, too.

Pain is the most distinguishing characteristic of fibromyalgia. Medically, it’s described as generalized musculoskeletal aches, pain and stiffness. For the pain to be diagnosed as fibromyalgia, it has to be present in all four body quadrants (arms and legs) for at least 3 months, and there has to be pain when pressure is applied to at least 11 of the 18 identified trigger points.

The pain waxes and wanes, varying in intensity. People have good days and bad days. Some days it’s not too bad; some days it’s pretty much disabling. The pain of fibromyalgia often gets worse on cold or humid days, when you haven’t slept well, when you are too inactive or too active, when you are stressed or when your hormones change.

The second most disabling characteristic of fibromyalgia is fatigue. Recent findings suggest that the fatigue is due to a stage four sleep disorder called alpha EEG anomaly. During deep stage four sleep, the brain has bursts of awake-like activity, so there is not enough undisturbed deep sleep for the body to get sufficient rest.

In addition to alpha EEG anomaly, many FMS sufferers also have sleep apnea, upper airway resistance syndrome, bruxism (teeth grinding during sleep), limb movement and jerking and restless leg syndrome. All of these contribute to the fatigue of fibromyalgia.

Pain and fatigue are the most disabling features of fibromyalgia, but there are other distressing symptoms, too. 40-70 per cent of fibromyalgia sufferers experience irritable bowel syndrome or other gastrointestinal problems. Constipation and diarrhea, abdominal pain, excessive gassiness, nausea and gastroesophageal reflux are common.

Many fibromyalgia sufferers are distressed by associated mental and emotional problems that manifest themselves alongside the physical ailments. Anxiety and depression are common. It’s not known whether they are independent factors, or if they are related to living in constant pain and fatigue and the social stigma of fibromyalgia. People also complain of confusion, experiencing difficulty thinking clearly and a reduction in ability to perform mental tasks. This overall mental fogginess has been termed “fibro fog.”

Other symptoms of fibromyalgia include headaches, restless leg syndrome, skin sensitivity and rashes, dry eyes and mouth, Reynaud’s syndrome, and various neurological problems.

Fibromyalgia is an invisible disease. Sufferers look fine on the surface. However, under their outward appearance they are often exhausted and in excruciating pain. Fibromyalgia is a chronic illness that is, at its worst, incredibly disabling. The symptoms have to be managed, and even then the pain and fatigue wax and wane. It’s a difficult disease to live with, but it’s not hopeless. Medical care and lifestyle management can make a big difference in how you feel if you are suffering from fibromyalgia.

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Natural Supplement to Alleviate Arthritic Symptoms

On the last post we have discussed about the importance of good nutrition to prevent arthritis and joint pain. But for people who already affected by the disease will need help to overcome their situation, taking drugs medication treatment or using natural supplements such as Celadrin, MSM, Glucosamine, and Chondroitin are commonly taken to alleviate arthritic symptoms.

Taken in pill form these supplements may take up to several months before individuals begin to feel better therefore most people give up before they even begin to see results. Pills are required to be broken down by the digestive system before the necessary ingredients can be absorbed by the bloodstream and intestinal track and it may take that long to get enough of these ingredients into the body to be helpful.

Gel-nutrition is a new natural alternative which takes these same proven ingredients and keeps them in a pre-hydrated state so that the body can quickly absorb them into the bloodstream for quick relief of pain and they begins to nourish the body and its joints with-in one hour after ingestion. Positive results have been seen with-in 4 to 72 hours depending on the individual.

Here are some brief explanations about these ingredients and what do they do.

Celadrin or cetyl myristoleate – is a blend of cetylated fatty acids that provides lubrication to the joints. Cetyl myristoleate was found to circulate in the blood of mice and made them immune to arthritis. Celadrin may also act as an anti-inflammatory agent.

MSM or methylsulfonylmethane – is a naturally occurring, organic, sulfur compound. Taken as a nutritional dietary source of sulfur, which is the 4th most abundant element in the human body, MSM is necessary for making and repairing cartilage. MSM has been shown to relieve pain as a result of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

Glucosamine – is a small carbohydrate molecule which is naturally synthesized (produced) in the body. This synthesis declines with aging therefore the need to supplement. Glucosamine supports cartilage maintenance and strength therefore reducing and relieving joint pain.

Chondroitin or chondroitin sulfate – is naturally synthesized in the body and supports strong cartilage. Chondroitin protects existing cartilage by reducing water loss and by slowing the breakdown of the cartilage. Glucosamine and Chondroitin work together to protect the cartilage from wear and tear and help it maintain its strength.

As you can see each supplement has its own job to do and how all 4 are necessary to maintaining healthy joints and reducing pain. But people need to know that these ingredients have slow results. Although people who are living with chronic pain want quick results, they need to realize this problem took years to create and would not be fixed overnight. The effect of these supplements can be felt after few weeks of regular consumption along with proper nutrition.

Do your body a favor, educate yourself on gel-nutrition and begin to enjoy life.

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Find Out More about Pain Management Doctors

Pain Management DoctorsIn most cases, the pain management doctors are happens to be anesthesiologists. Anesthesiologists ensure that you are safe, pain-free and comfortable during and after surgery. They are also at work in the labor and delivery area, or in doctors’ chambers where painful medical tests or procedures are performed. But the methods applied by anesthesiologists have now traveled beyond these familiar territories, and led to the development of a new category of medicine known as pain medicine.

In many cases, an anesthesiologist heads a team of other specialists and doctors who work together to alleviate your pain. The anesthesiologist or other pain medicine doctors like neurologists, oncologists, orthopedists, and psychiatrists, and non-physician specialists like nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, physical or rehabilitation therapists and psychologists, join together to assess your condition. After a thorough assessment, this team of specialists develops a treatment plan just for you.

Pain management doctors are specialists at diagnosing the reasons for your pain as well as treating the pain itself. Arthritis, back and neck pain, cancer pain, nerve pain, migraine headaches, shingles, and phantom limb pain for amputees are among the most common pain problems they usually manage.

Pain management doctors also treat acute pain caused by surgery, a debilitating illness or a serious injury. Among such pains is post knee-joint replacement pain, pain during recovery from a car accident, pain following stomach or chest surgery, or pain associated with sickle cell disease. They can treat the patient in the hospital or in an outpatient clinic.

The pain medicine doctor usually works closely with your own physician. They will review your medical records and X-rays as required. To have a clear understanding of the case, they will give you a detailed questionnaire. Your replies will help them to assess how your pain is affecting your daily life. Pain management doctors will also carry out a complete physical examination on you. They may even go for additional tests and review all the results to find the root cause of your pain and determine how the problem can be solved.

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