The Importance of Good Nutrition to Prevent Arthritis and Joint Pain

Good Nutrition to Prevent ArthritisToday it is very easy to meet other people who are living with daily joint pain. It does not matter what the age or physical shape of the person, daily pain seems to be a common complaint. Living with chronic pain can wear a person down, affecting energy levels, mood and overall stamina.

The cause can vary however Arthritis is typically the root problem. Arthritis comes in more than 100 forms and one does not need to be of old age to have this debilitating disease. The cost of arthritis around the world is estimated more than $400 billion in medical expenses and lost productivity every year.

Preventative health care is felt as boring process and as a result most individuals do not provide their body with nutritional supplements until they are sick or in pain. We do not eat properly to get the nutrition required while the ingredients are very easily to find such as fresh vegetables, fruits, fresh meats and fishes. And sometimes even if we manage to do so there is very little in nutrients remaining once we cook our food at high temperatures.

Therefore it is very important to begin to nourish our joints at a young age to prevent Arthritis. Unfortunately many people are often did not take the precaution until they can no longer stand the pain.

As we get older our joints begin to lose lubrication, this can also happen earlier due to an injury or excessive stress on the joints as a result of sporting activity or repetitive motion. Once the joint begins to lose moisture we experience the loss of flexibility, and an increase in inflammation which results in stiffness and pain. We need to preserve the cartilage and fluid in all of our joints to maintain flexibility and live an active life.

Once symptoms begin the first thing most people resort to is pain medication however this just masks the underlying problem and does not provide nourishment to improve lubrication to the affected area.

The fight against Arthritis is to begin early in life with good nutrition. Good nutrition also means the taking of daily nutritional supplements along with a balanced diet. A person should begin to supplement the diet as early as 30 years of age to fend off Arthritis symptoms later in life.

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Pain Management Using Alternative Methods

Pain Management Using Alternative MethodsPain management and healing are often inseparable and there is no reason why alternative methods such as self-hypnosis should not be used to manage pain and bring about positive effects in the healing process. Pain management is a problem that contemporary medicine has struggled with for quite some time and often people only find relief when using alternative methods.

There are various different management strategies for chronic pain in the alternative health field and methods such as acupuncture and massage therapy have proven to be highly effective.

These methods can often help to reduce the dependence on pain-killing medications. One of the problems that are seen with chronic pain management through the use of medication is that fact that the brain habituates to pain killing drugs and this requires higher and higher doses of the medications.

Using some of the more powerful painkillers that are often prescribe by doctors such as Hydrocodone and Oxycontin, can often lead to serious addiction of taken for long periods of time.

They are effective but this is one of the reasons why many people prefer to try the alternative methods as the first resort for their pain management. Obviously the strategies that are taken for the management will depend on the type and the severity of the pain.

Many of the pain clinics will focus initially on one form of treatment, as this will allow better feedback on the effectiveness of that treatment. This treatment will often be a course of anti-inflammatory drugs or steroids to reduce the inflammation. In more severe cases the drugs will be injected into the area that is causing the pain.

Additionally, pain clinics will prescribe anti-anxiety medication to relieve the tension that has built up from the pain.

Obviously these steps will only be taken after the patient has had no success with the milder over-the-counter drugs.

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Exercise for Arthritis to Relieve Joints Pain & Stiffness

Even when you cannot make it out to walk or to an aquatics or yoga class, there are exercises you can do daily to improve flexibility, strength and conditioning when you suffer from arthritis. You can flex your legs while sitting in a chair facing forward, simply by moving your leg outward while keeping your foot on the floor and holding it there for a few seconds, then retracting it until your foot is behind you, then alternating to the other leg.

Interlocking your fingers and slowly flexing your wrists to the left and the right for a few minutes a day can help tremendously to increase flexibility and reduce pain in the wrist area.

For your upper back, you can stand upright in front of a table, then lean over and place your hands on the table and tuck your chin back toward your collarbone. Once positioned as such, lift your upper back upward and simultaneously take a deep breath.

Hold that position for 5-10 seconds and then relax while exhaling. While doing this, lower your spine slowly as you move both shoulder blades forward as if toward each other. Repeat this exercise for 10-15 repetitions.

For the shoulders and middle back, start again from an upright position standing as straight as you can, reach back and lock the fingers of both hands together. Breathe slowly and deeply and lift upward with your shoulders while at the same time, exhaling. Be sure to keep your chest up and your chin in. Repeat this for about 10-15 sets.

For the shoulders and upper chest, choose a free corner of the room to stand in and place your hands on the opposite sides of the corner. Take a step back about 18 inches from the corner. You now should be facing the corner directly with your hands on both of the walls with your body some distance from the wall itself. Keep your chest up after inhaling, and then lean in toward the corner while exhaling. Repeat this exercise for 10-15 sets.

Whatever exercise program you choose, be sure to breathe properly when exercising. Oxygenation is important to any exercise regimen as it promotes a healthy heart rate and reduces fatigue; additionally oxygenation helps circulation, which is vital to achieving the flexibility and strength that you are trying to achieve in battling arthritis.

Also, listen to your body. It is natural to feel a little fatigue and soreness when starting a new exercise regimen, However if the pain of soreness persists for more than one hour, or you have a decrease in mobility that lasts longer than an hour, then the regimen should be reduced until the soreness desists. Also, look for signs of increased swelling of joints or any persistent increase of weakness; these are signs of activities that are too strenuous and a reduction in activity will be necessary.

Just remember to take all new exercise regimens slowly at the start. The idea is to increase flexibility not train for the Olympics.

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Pain Memory

Old PainDo you ever experiencing an old injury pain although there is no obvious reason why?

It’s not just your imagination and perhaps researchers have found that there is a rational explanation. According to some researches there is a direct link between pain and memory. Constant, reoccurring or intense pain may result from a central nervous system that “remembers” painful sensations for an unusually long time.

These findings provide evidence that indicate some people have an abnormal ability to ‘remember pain’ from previous traumas. Because when we injure ourselves the nervous system becomes sensitized, encoding the link between the injury and the pain. This learning is important as it helps to protect the body from future or similar injuries. Then there’s a healing process, and usually the ‘pain memory’ goes away. But if it doesn’t the resulting memory can manifest itself in phantom pain that can linger long after the healing of the original trauma.

The fact that the body stores a memory of previous pain is a discovery that might well lead to a whole new approach to treating chronic pain. It may provide a foundation for developing alternative therapies that treat the memory storage mechanism, which creates pain in muscles and soft tissues throughout the body, causing sleep problems and fatigue.

One example of this ‘pain memory’ research had revealed on the puzzling disease of fibromyalgia. It has no known cause. Existing treatments provide little to no relief for the chronic pain associated with it. Traditional blood tests and scans do not detect any anomalies associated with the disease. All of which has led many physicians to question if the pain is real. Real or not, the American College of Rheumatology estimates that 6 million Americans suffer from fibromyalgia. The majority of which are women between the ages of eighteen and forty.

Painkillers may have little effect on this type of pain

The discovery of the link between pain and memory should result in the development of a new type of drug providing alternatives to the traditional painkillers. It’s obvious that a different approach to pain relief is needed because the concern with the standard drugs that treat pain, like opiates, is that you are reducing this normal physiological function of the pain system, and you’re endangering the cell. So if you would not feel injury anymore, your normal life is strongly impeded. So what you need is something that would treat the pathological pain and not the normal pain.

That’s why many people with this type of ‘pathological pain’ are turning to alternative treatments and medication that heal the psychological aspects of the problem and reduce the capacity of the central nervous system to store ‘pain memory’. Perhaps this is why people who use relaxation techniques to reduce anxiety or stress also report reductions in pain levels.

Although an effective relaxation technique many people are wary of hypnosis, which is why instead many turn to suggestion audios that mix a combination of relaxing music, state changing ‘binaural beats’ and therapeutic affirmations.

In conclusion, there seems little doubt that ‘pain memory’ may well be the cause of much unresolved suffering. Make no mistake, this is real pain. It is not imagined, because the trigger is within the central nervous system. But this type of pain can be significantly reduced or totally alleviated by using techniques better recognized for improving mental wellbeing rather than resorting to chemical painkillers.

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